Massage | Reflexology | Aromatherapy | Kinesiology
Government Accredited Training – RTO 40815

Kirsty Newbery

Reflexology – what is it and how can it help?

reflexology chartA lot of people ask me, what is reflexology?

Reflexology is the ancient treatment of the feet – dating back thousands of years from many cultures of greater Asia, the Middle East and Egypt. Old graphic texts show people massaging the feet of others in various ways. These texts also show various maps of the feet and the relationship to the organs and major joints of the body.

Many forms of treatment took place including massage, oils, and the use of instruments, sticks, stones, knuckles, brushes and the like.

The modern form of reflexology is similar with attention given to our soft skin as these days we tend to wear better shoes than ancient people did. It involves specific massage techniques which stimulate the reflex points of the feet in relation to the organs and joints.

What is reflexology good for?

reflexology massageApart from the obvious – (it’s great for your feet!); research studies have shown that reflexology is very effective for constipation, diarrhoea, anxiety, depression, and during uncomplicated labour to bring balance and improve efficiency of contractions.

I have also helped people with headaches/sore neck/hips/knees/back using specific reflexology points to alleviate pain and soreness from those areas. They are usually amazed at the result. The great thing is I can then teach them how to massage those points at home and continue the treatment for themselves.

Students of reflexology are surprised with wonder at how effective reflexology is when they are learning and experiencing it for themselves on a regular basis.

Reflexology is a mostly gentle, non-invasive way to treatment many common complaints of pain and discomfort without the use of drugs. That’s why more people are interested in learning more about it.

Kirsty Newbery - Aminya AcademyAbout the author:

Kirsty teaches reflexology for Aminya Academy

Kirsty is an experienced therapist and teacher with a studio business in Strathpine called Caring Cottage.

Remedial Massage and Private Health Insurance – getting value for money

facial massageIt’s a new year and that means most health funds reset – time to check your cover!

Do you know what you’re getting cover for when you signed up for private health insurance?
There are a lot of people who have ‘extras’ or ‘ancillary’ cover on their private health insurance who are not taking regular opportunities to avail themselves of the rebate for remedial massage.

When, for example, we signed up for health insurance with our current provider, we stated that we would like cover that includes rebates for regular massage therapy. When the calculations were done, the salesman stated that our level of cover equated to the ability to have a discounted massage every 2 weeks.

“Sweet!” I thought. Because I usually have a remedial massage every 3 weeks to manage ongoing myalgia issues. So now I just have my regular appointments made every three weeks, stay healthy and happy (happy wife, happy life, right?)

But how do you choose a quality massage therapy provider and how do you know they are providing that services and not just a ‘back-yarder’?back massage

Here are a few things to look for when considering a remedial massage therapist:

Are they a registered member of a natural therapies association?

Look for associations such as Australian Association of Massage Therapists (AAMT), Australian Natural Therapies Association (ANTA) and (AMT).

If these are not readily visible on the person’s advertising, then simply ask, or look them up. The associations have their registered members listed.

A registered massage therapist has undergone an industry recognised and accredited training, has a current first aid certificate and public indemnity insurance.

pregnancy massageAre they registered with HICAPS?

HICAPS is a financial scheme which allows the holder of participating health insurance cards to claim their rebate ‘on the spot’ and the consumer simply then pays the gap directly to the provider.

Whilst this is not mandatory, it demonstrates a level of commitment to the industry by having made the steps to be recognised by the big health insurance providers. Medibank Private currently governs the status quo of massage therapy in the HICAPS arena.

HICAPS is also convenient for consumers as they can pay for everything with card – health insurance card and credit cards. No cash necessary.

hicaps logoSo check out your private health insurance to see what you can get as a rebate for massage therapy – it’s easy, just ask for a quote! If you ‘re considering a particular therapist it’s also okay to ask what their fee is so that you can get a corrected quote from your provider. That way you know how much gap fee you’ll need to pay. Makes the treatment a lot more enjoyable when you know what the bill will be and not getting a surprise at the end!

Have a great week!

Kirsty is an experienced remedial massage therapist who owns and operates a studio business at Strathpine called Caring Cottage. You can contact her anytime for more information or go on the webpage


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